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A father’s reflection of his first visit to The Royal South Street Eisteddfod

By 18/02/2016Stories

At 8:15am on a morning punctuated by rain and sun, the Novice Solo Classical 6 years under 8 contestants gather from around the state, all with their hopes and dreams. The highly accredited adjudicator, no novice among these novices, has danced in London and judged from Wollongong to Newcastle to Sydney and now Ballarat.

Sitting in her Majesty’s Theatre, the audience is masked by darkness. Grandma to my right, my four year old to my left, and Mum, a veteran of two eisteddfods, judges each performance making notes on her program.

Then my daughter takes the stage – her first solo home town performance built on hours of practice on her make-do stage of kitchen and living room. From tiles to carpet around tables and chairs. She is minute on this large stage that will become her world for the next three minutes. She looks good so I relax a little before judging time.

Dance done and the tension is akin to the Brownlow vote final round countdown. Breath baited and the winner is …. “with grace and poise and potential”  my daughter Ally Moore.

Having experienced South Street Competitions for the first time, in the probably surreal setting of a victory, the encouragement and support of the event was a credit to everyone involved. Bravo South Street and Ballarat for fostering our future talent and opportunities.

Proud dad, Nicholas Moore

PS. Daughter Ally is now Co Captain Australian Ballet School and daughter Ruby went on to win the 2015 Royal South Street Courier Classic and Carol Trenfield Perpetual Trophy.